Latymer Upper raise money to SOS Children's Villages

 


Louise Shelley and
Louise Summers
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Two local teachers who visited an orphanage in Malawi have inspired students at Latymer Upper School in Hammersmith to raise several thousand pounds in support of the charity SOS Children’s Villages.

Louise Shelley and Louise Summers (who teach English and Religious Studies respectively) have established a formal link between Latymer and the charity, which aims to provide permanent homes and a stable environment to children who have lost their parents. They visited Malawi over the summer and returned to Latymer determined to get their pupils involved in raising money for the charity.

“We were so impressed by the charity’s work and overwhelmed by the warmth and generosity of everyone we met,” says Louise Shelley. “When we returned to Latymer, we talked to our students about what we had seen. They were fascinated and have willingly got involved in a wide range of fund-raising activities. It is very exciting because they have already managed to raise nearly £4,000 for this excellent cause.”

So far, £2,000 has been raised from a non-uniform day during term-time – this money will go towards water pumps in the areas supported by the charity. In addition, five different classes at the school have raised money to sponsor one child each for one year (it costs £20 per month to sponsor a child). Pupils from Year 8 also organised a raffle and doughnut stall which raised £700 – this will go towards a fund of £3,000 that they hope to raise in order to fund an entire house of 12 orphans for a year. These are just some of the funds raised so far.

Malawi is one of the poorest countries in the world. Almost half the population are under 15 years of age and the government cautiously estimates that 10% of the population are orphans. Most of these orphans are taken in by relatives, but SOS Children’s Villages provides homes for over 300 children who have nowhere else to go.

February 5, 2006